All Things Coffee ...

joe

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I googled the aeropress. Everyone raves about it. Can such a small and inexpensive thing really produce such great coffee? I guess I'm about to find out.
Aeropress does make a good (and fast!) cup of coffee. The downside is you can only make one cup at a time
 
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adam

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Aeropress does make a good (and fast!) cup of coffee. The downside is you can only make one cup at a time
Well since I'm only making for myself, it's that's actually a plus. Less waste. Beans last longer.
 
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kylelovescrayons

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sorry for my slowness - work has been a bear and we rescued a puppy who is alos a bear + terrorist + adorable.

So here goes -
My aeropress recipe for espresso and regular coffee making -

"Espresso"

Recipe

  • Brew Style: Inverted
  • Coffee: 22 grams
  • Grind Size: Slightly courser than espresso (9 on my baratza)
  • Water: 175 grams at 204F
  • Water-to-Coffee Ratio: 8:1
  • Brew Time: 1:00

Method

  1. Invert the aeropress and adjust the plunger so that it is level with the "4"
  2. Grind 22g of coffee on "coarse espresso" setting and put it in the Aeropress.
  3. Bloom the coffee grouns - about 40 grams of water - covering all the coffee, allowing grounds to bubble and settle (30-40 seconds) before topping off with water in order to fill Aeropress all the way (this should take somewhere between 170 and 190g of water).
  4. Stir continuously for one minute.
  5. Place pre-wet filter on Aeropress, invert onto cup, and pull up slightly, then plunge into cup.
  6. Optional: add hot water to cup for an Americano-style Aeropress.
Standard Coffee Styles

Recipe

  • Brew Style: Inverted
  • Coffee: 20 grams
  • Grind Size: Finer side of Medium
  • Water: 220 grams at 200F
  • Water-to-Coffee Ratio: 11:1
  • Brew Time: 1:40

Method

  1. Add coffee
  2. Start timer and add 60g water
  3. A quick turbulent stir for 15 seconds
  4. Bloom for 30 seconds
  5. Add remaining water up to 220g in tight to widening circles 10 seconds
  6. In vert over mug and plunge (again pull up a little first) for 45 second
Old very simple recipe I was given by old barista buddy -

Finer grind. 220 grams water > 16 grams coffee. Slowly pour all water. Immediately stir. Total extraction/steep time 2 minutes = aeropress


For these recipes I am using the "inverted method" google a video of that - it's silly to explain and once you see it you will be all set.

Also what have I been drinking you ask?

An amazing "Espresso" roast set of beans from Ethiopia that my girlfriend picked up in england from a coffee shop called "The department of coffee and social affairs" https://departmentofcoffee.com/ which is a great name.

Tandem's Burundi Single Origin half wash half natural (basically they dry it on a raised bed and then give it a fast wash) interesting - very good as a cup of coffee, holds up ok as espresso in my aeropress, less so in my espresso machine.

Verve's Chelchele Ethiopian - a wet process coffee - really complicated - fruity at first but lots of flavors as you sip it. Only mad eone cup so far - I'm excited for more.
 
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adam

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sorry for my slowness - work has been a bear and we rescued a puppy who is alos a bear + terrorist + adorable.

So here goes -
My aeropress recipe for espresso and regular coffee making -

"Espresso"

Recipe

  • Brew Style: Inverted
  • Coffee: 22 grams
  • Grind Size: Slightly courser than espresso (9 on my baratza)
  • Water: 175 grams at 204F
  • Water-to-Coffee Ratio: 8:1
  • Brew Time: 1:00

Method

  1. Invert the aeropress and adjust the plunger so that it is level with the "4"
  2. Grind 22g of coffee on "coarse espresso" setting and put it in the Aeropress.
  3. Bloom the coffee grouns - about 40 grams of water - covering all the coffee, allowing grounds to bubble and settle (30-40 seconds) before topping off with water in order to fill Aeropress all the way (this should take somewhere between 170 and 190g of water).
  4. Stir continuously for one minute.
  5. Place pre-wet filter on Aeropress, invert onto cup, and pull up slightly, then plunge into cup.
  6. Optional: add hot water to cup for an Americano-style Aeropress.
Standard Coffee Styles

Recipe



    • Brew Style: Inverted
    • Coffee: 20 grams
    • Grind Size: Finer side of Medium
    • Water: 220 grams at 200F
    • Water-to-Coffee Ratio: 11:1
    • Brew Time: 1:40
Method



    • Add coffee
    • Start timer and add 60g water
    • A quick turbulent stir for 15 seconds
    • Bloom for 30 seconds
    • Add remaining water up to 220g in tight to widening circles 10 seconds
    • In vert over mug and plunge (again pull up a little first) for 45 second
Old very simple recipe I was given by old barista buddy -

Finer grind. 220 grams water > 16 grams coffee. Slowly pour all water. Immediately stir. Total extraction/steep time 2 minutes = aeropress


For these recipes I am using the "inverted method" google a video of that - it's silly to explain and once you see it you will be all set.

Also what have I been drinking you ask?

An amazing "Espresso" roast set of beans from Ethiopia that my girlfriend picked up in england from a coffee shop called "The department of coffee and social affairs" https://departmentofcoffee.com/ which is a great name.

Tandem's Burundi Single Origin half wash half natural (basically they dry it on a raised bed and then give it a fast wash) interesting - very good as a cup of coffee, holds up ok as espresso in my aeropress, less so in my espresso machine.

Verve's Chelchele Ethiopian - a wet process coffee - really complicated - fruity at first but lots of flavors as you sip it. Only mad eone cup so far - I'm excited for more.
Can't wait to try these! Thanks!
 

kylelovescrayons

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Can't wait to try these! Thanks!
Good luck and god speed.

What else do you have going in your setup? Do you have a digital scale yet? I found that weighing out my beans led to far better and more consistent coffee compared to using a measurement such as a teaspoon etc. what grinder are you using/planning to use?

Keep me posted.
 
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adam

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Good luck and god speed.

What else do you have going in your setup? Do you have a digital scale yet? I found that weighing out my beans led to far better and more consistent coffee compared to using a measurement such as a teaspoon etc. what grinder are you using/planning to use?

Keep me posted.
This is my humble little setup.
IMG_9754.JPG
 

kylelovescrayons

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Not humble at all. I know that grinder well. It's burrs so that's a great place to start. Get a scale with a timer. Hario makes one that is over priced but it works. You can always use your phone to time things as well. But definitely get a scale to measure coffee and to measure as you fill the brewer with water.
 
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413Blue

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I read some of the beginning of this thread and was sad for two reasons.

1.) I never even heard of half of the things/methods people were talking about.

2.) Many of the posters haven't been active in years....some good ones.


As for coffee, I drink tons and very happily enjoy it with very limited sophistication. I only drink black coffee so it's pretty simple for me. I have a Ninja system that someone got me a few years ago which is great for either grounds but also k-cup option. I occasionally use the kcups because I found one I like pretty well (Kirkland Dark Roast) but 80% of my coffee is freshly ground in my house. Once again, I have a few beans I like that are all sold at Costco.

If I'm out and about, I hate Starbucks and Dunkin black coffee as well as McDonald's. The one place I routinely go to and am generally satisfied is a regional convenience chain called Cumberland Farms. As much as I'd like to support small local shops, I'd never pay $3+ for a cup of black coffee....ever.
 
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mgarbowski

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Measure the temperature of the water at multiple points in the process.
Weigh the grinds.
Do the entire process by hand to make just one cup.

So this must be the no-doubt, perfect recipe for making coffee, if you go to all that trouble, right?

“About 60% of the time, I’m quite unhappy,” he confessed. “I make a lot of bad coffee.”


 
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Seth

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Measure the temperature of the water at multiple points in the process.
Weigh the grinds.
Do the entire process by hand to make just one cup.

So this must be the no-doubt, perfect recipe for making coffee, right?
“About 60% of the time, I’m quite unhappy,” he confessed. “I make a lot of bad coffee.”


Yeah, that struck me as odd also. I do 195° water, 19g coffee, burr grinder, four minutes in an inverted AeroPress. Simple, and comes out almost universally great every time. I got a better scale a while ago though and that's made a noticeable difference. My old one was fine but it was only to-the-gram precision. The new one is tenth-of-a-gram precision, which means I'm not using 19.4 grams one day and 18.6g the next. Great coffee every time. Life's too short for "a lot of bad coffee."
 

mgarbowski

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Yeah, that struck me as odd also. I do 195° water, 19g coffee, burr grinder, four minutes in an inverted AeroPress. Simple, and comes out almost universally great every time. I got a better scale a while ago though and that's made a noticeable difference. My old one was fine but it was only to-the-gram precision. The new one is tenth-of-a-gram precision, which means I'm not using 19.4 grams one day and 18.6g the next. Great coffee every time. Life's too short for "a lot of bad coffee."
I am blessed in that I love good coffee, can tolerate bad (just not weak) coffee, and find the difference between good and great coffee minimal to non-existent, so I don't need to worry about any of this. I buy good coffee and make it by the pot using a machine and I'm happy, like 98% of the time. I'm a very satisfied coffee vulgarian. But that's not for everyone. So, if you or adam adam or anyone else finds taking all that time and effort pays off, good for you. To each his own and everyone needs hobbies. In fact I read the article because I like reading about things people are passionate about even if it's not my thing.

But to the idiot who goes to all that trouble and then still says it renders bad coffee more often than not, and that as a result he is unhappy 60% of the time, I say, buy yourself a f#^king Mr. Coffee and think about your life choices.
 
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FootyLovin

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Yeah, that struck me as odd also. I do 195° water, 19g coffee, burr grinder, four minutes in an inverted AeroPress. Simple, and comes out almost universally great every time. I got a better scale a while ago though and that's made a noticeable difference. My old one was fine but it was only to-the-gram precision. The new one is tenth-of-a-gram precision, which means I'm not using 19.4 grams one day and 18.6g the next. Great coffee every time. Life's too short for "a lot of bad coffee."
While I will gladly swear by my DeLonghi Dinamica (purchased with Amex points), arguably the most valuable piece of equipment is your brain. I recently did a 1 week challenge to spend 10 minutes every day savoring something you really enjoy. I chose my first cup of coffee each morning. Usually I take special note of the first sip or two, but admittedly then I drink my coffee while reading the paper, clearing overnight emails, etc. I enjoy the cup, but I'm not truly focused on it.

The week I did the challenge was different. For those 10 minutes I just stood with my coffee looking out my back door. I tasted more. I was more appreciative of the aroma. I felt more peaceful. I loved every cup I did that with. It really did transform my morning experience.

Then, because I'm an asshole, after the week long challenge ended, I went back to my shitty routine of under-appreciating my coffee while answering emails. What a moron.
 

413Blue

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While I will gladly swear by my DeLonghi Dinamica (purchased with Amex points), arguably the most valuable piece of equipment is your brain. I recently did a 1 week challenge to spend 10 minutes every day savoring something you really enjoy. I chose my first cup of coffee each morning. Usually I take special note of the first sip or two, but admittedly then I drink my coffee while reading the paper, clearing overnight emails, etc. I enjoy the cup, but I'm not truly focused on it.

The week I did the challenge was different. For those 10 minutes I just stood with my coffee looking out my back door. I tasted more. I was more appreciative of the aroma. I felt more peaceful. I loved every cup I did that with. It really did transform my morning experience.

Then, because I'm an asshole, after the week long challenge ended, I went back to my shitty routine of under-appreciating my coffee while answering emails. What a moron.
I started the same thing when I bought my current house a couple years ago. I get up about 15 minutes earlier specifically to sit on my back porch with a coffee. It sets a better tone for the day, but sometimes the coffee takes a backseat. Like yesterday, I heard excessive chirping from under the porch. I went underneath and saw a birds nest on one of the beams and saw 5 chicks in it. Last week, two deer came grazing along my tree line (I've seen Deer numerous times in the morning). I've also seen Fox, bobcats, tons of small things like rabbits and chipmunk and even saw a bear once. I probably would never see these things if I didn't do this most mornings, and it's very therapeutic.