Wsj Article-why I Hate American Soccer Fans

MikeDatTiger

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http://online.wsj.com/articles/why-i-hate-american-soccer-fans-1402012291

A lot of fans are taking offense, but I thought it was actually kind of funny for most of the piece. I too don't quite understand why we're all wearing scarves over jerseys in 90 degree heat. I don't mind that we use the terms England uses (like kit and match). I really agreed with this though:

The great regret about all this is that mimicking the customs of fans from everywhere else could hinder the development of your own American soccer identity.
One of the joys of soccer is seeing how different cultures view, interpret and celebrate the game in their own distinct ways.
 

Andy

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It´s like suggesting that European Ice-Hockey teams shouldn´t use terms like icing or fore-checking which they do.. Watched a lot of European Hockey during the NHL lock-out and their speakers used American terms.
 

einwindir

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First line...

>Growing up as a soccer fan in England
Oh boy...

The article actually isn't bad though once you figure out where they're going. The term we call them 'EuroSnobs'. They are slime though. Just like in beer culture, we've got people who enjoy beer and those who turn every drink into "The Belgians do this better because...." ie Beer Snobs. In metal (my other vice) you've got the purists - if it wasn't recorded in 'neath the freezing winter moon then it just isn't kvlt enough.

It is kinda lame that WSJ is posting an article that makes fun of a subset of wannabes and fanatics though.
 

Samuel Youn

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Soccer is one of the only televised sports in the United States that did not originate from the US or North America. The game in it's entirety is different. There are no commercial breaks. There are no video replays (for the time being). Whether we like it or not, the game will have influences from abroad (mainly England) as it originated there. We did try to American-ize the game during the formative years of the MLS and failed miserably.

The "beautiful game" as he calls it is beautiful the way it is so we don't change it. That's not to see being a fan means we have to keep the same traditions as fans abroad do. However!...

Maybe the writer is upset or not used to American's adopting other fan culture because this is the first non-American/Canadian sport to become big in the US. Why not adopt something new? We do all the same stuff for all the other sports. What is the crime in adopting what much of the rest of the world is doing? We definitely need to put our own spin in it but being upset about scarves in 90 degree weather is ignorant. Obviously people know it is hot and it makes no sense. However it is the culture of this sport that did not originate in the States and I don't think it's a crime to appreciate it.
 

MikeDatTiger

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First line...

>Growing up as a soccer fan in England
Oh boy...

The article actually isn't bad though once you figure out where they're going. The term we call them 'EuroSnobs'. They are slime though. Just like in beer culture, we've got people who enjoy beer and those who turn every drink into "The Belgians do this better because...." ie Beer Snobs. In metal (my other vice) you've got the purists - if it wasn't recorded in 'neath the freezing winter moon then it just isn't kvlt enough.

It is kinda lame that WSJ is posting an article that makes fun of a subset of wannabes and fanatics though.

I am an admitted Beer snob. I'm not actually all that knowledgeable, but I got spoiled by a local campus bar that had a bunch of incredible international brews on tap. Ah, college.
 

Tiger Jones

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People like the ones he mentioned certainly exist, there's no question. I've seen it; especially being around many EPL fans in the NYC bar scene. BUT, a vast majority of fans, I think, are very respectful of the history of the clubs they support and the game in general, taking the time to learn all the nuances, etc. There are always going to be new people getting into the sport (and there has certainly been a boom this year) and maybe don't have the knowledge that many others have but that's what happens when you don't grow up with it or around it.

Secondly, about the English mimicking - what do you expect? The Prem is the best league in the world (in my opinion) and English is our native language. It's inevitable that this sort of culture was going to pop up. And let's be honest, the singing, chanting, scarves, etc, it's all part of the pomp and circumstance and it's just plain fun. Foreign supporters from all over the world do the same exact thing so I don't think it's fair to single Americans out.

I think this guy needs to take a wider perspective and stop having his own brand of snobbery.
 

SebastianBlue

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The biggest issue I have with the piece is that he contradicts himself several times. He simultaneously asserts that Americans have pilfered all of their "soccer" culture from other places and then brags about admonishing American supporters for using specifically American phrases that are apparently wrong. He asserts that "tifos" are only acceptable in every country—many of which adopted them from viewing another countries efforts (it didn't inexplicably develop independently but simultaneously around the world).

He loses all credibility (and argument continuity) in my mind.

Also, he uses the word "hate", which is completely unnecessary in nearly any usage (my own annoyance, admittedly),
 
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Vinjay

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The biggest issue I have with the piece is that he contradicts himself several times. He simultaneously asserts that Americans have pilfered all of their "soccer" culture from other places and then brags about admonishing American supporters for using specifically American phrases that are apparently wrong. He asserts that "tifos" are only acceptable in every country—many of which adopted them from viewing another countries efforts (it didn't inexplicably develop independently but simultaneously around the world).

He loses all credibility (and argument continuity) in my mind.

Also, he uses the word "hate", which is completely unnecessary in nearly any usage (my own annoyance, admittedly),

Well a lot of people use the word "hate" without the right context especially in football. As a personal example I've openly referred to hating Man United and undoubtedly will again. Yet its not at the point where I've contemplated attacking anyone in a United shirt and that's generally the same for vast majority who "hate" them. So maybe the term ought to be "strong dislike" or "high contempt" but the overall point is sometimes people take words too literally.
 
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SebastianBlue

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Well a lot of people use the word "hate" without the right context especially in football. As a personal example I've openly referred to hating Man United and undoubtedly will again. Yet its not at the point where I've contemplated attacking anyone in a United shirt and that's generally the same for vast majority who "hate" them. So maybe the term ought to be "strong dislike" or "high contempt" but the overall point is sometimes people take words too literally.

I understand what you mean. I think, in this case though, people do not take the word as literally as I believe they should. I am normally the person defending the natural evolution and mutation of language but, as you said, we have words or phrases conveying differing degrees of negative assessment. We have quite a few, actually—it's one of the few ways English keeps up with Ancient Greek. So—and again, this is only my perspective—I see no reason to use one of (if not the) most purely negative words in the language (there are admittedly others that impart more nuanced meanings but "hate" is considered to be one of the most primal utterances of speech). I think the more we are aware of the words we use, and their relative place in communication, the more likely it is that we operate away from the extremity ("I love that" or "I hate that").

I didn't mean to hijack the thread, though, so I'll stop my pontification.
 
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Sean Og

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Lads, i think we can all agree that this writer frankly speaking.... is a *****.
I know the type of people he is speaking of, however, he can fuck off.
Sure look it, he thinks he's great and all, but he just sounds like an insolent hipster who gets mad when an indie band pops up on top 40.

To finish my profane argument he is writing for the WSJ which proves, beyond a reasonable doubt that he is an insufferable twat.

o_O
 
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Midas Mulligan

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Lads, i think we can all agree that this writer frankly speaking.... is a *****.
I know the type of people he is speaking of, however, he can fuck off.
Sure look it, he thinks he's great and all, but he just sounds like an insolent hipster who gets mad when an indie band pops up on top 40.

To finish my profane argument he is writing for the WSJ which proves, beyond a reasonable doubt that he is an insufferable twat.

o_O
I like the journal. This ingrown pubic hair, however, needs his ass whipped.

He's the worst sort of hypocrite. Fuck, I hate sharing oxygen with these pseudo-intellectual, hipsteriffic punks.
 
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