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Across the Pond

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I'd be looking to come over to NYC about the end of October next year, what round of fixtures will this be or is it already be the playoffs? I'm stuck for times really, as I have to fit it around the school holidays. I should be all right though, as It'll be my first year of College (what's that in the States? Like 2nd year of high school?)
 
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Falastur

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Not related to thread but I suppose this is the best place for it.

I'd be looking to come over to NYC about the end of October next year, what round of fixtures will this be or is it already be the playoffs? I'm stuck for times really, as I have to fit it around the school holidays. I should be all right though, as It'll be my first year of College (what's that in the States? Like 2nd year of high school?)

Depending on how close to the end of October you mean, either the last round of the regular season or the start of the play-offs. You're pretty lucky if you can be doing a trip to the US while you're still in college.

Also, I believe first year of college (I take it you mean Sixth Form) would be 10th Grade in the US.
 

NYCFC_Dan

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Not related to thread but I suppose this is the best place for it.

I'd be looking to come over to NYC about the end of October next year, what round of fixtures will this be or is it already be the playoffs? I'm stuck for times really, as I have to fit it around the school holidays. I should be all right though, as It'll be my first year of College (what's that in the States? Like 2nd year of high school?)

For us first year of college is first year of college XD. It's when you go to a university or community college after finishing Highschool (12th year).
 
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Falastur

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For us first year of college is first year of college XD. It's when you go to a university or community college after finishing Highschool (12th year).

College in the UK means going to an independent institution to do your last two years of school. Also, school for us ends at the age of 18, not 19. Your version of college is only ever referred to as University (or "Uni") here.
 
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CP_Scouse

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as a student i can confirm college doe not start at 1oth grade (year 11).

Year 1 U.K= Kindergarten U.S (funfact, the first kindergarten EVER in the U.S was in C.P ;))
Year 2 = First Grade
Year 3 = Second Grade
Year 4= Third Grade
Year 5= Fourth Grade
Year 6= Fifth Grade

Year 7= Sixth Grade(JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)
year 8 = seventh Grade (Junior Highschool)
Year 9 = eighth grade (Junior Highachool)

Year 10= Freshman in High school (ninth grade)
Year11 = Sophmore in High school (tenth grade)
Year 12= Junior in High school (eleventh grade)
Year 13= Senior in High school

______= Freshman in College/ Uni
______= Sophmore in College/Uni
______= Junior in College/Uni
______= Senior in College/Uni

every year in highschool, students get state regents'. sadly students only need to pass only one to graduate. but at private schools its different
thats how it works in NY, other states its different
 
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Across the Pond

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as a student i can confirm college doe not start at 1oth grade (year 11).

Year 1 U.K= Kindergarten U.S (funfact, the first kindergarten EVER in the U.S was in C.P ;))
Year 2 = First Grade
Year 3 = Second Grade
Year 4= Third Grade
Year 5= Fourth Grade
Year 6= Fifth Grade

Year 7= Sixth Grade(JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)
year 8 = seventh Grade (Junior Highschool)
Year 9 = eighth grade (Junior Highachool)

Year 10= Freshman in High school (ninth grade)
Year11 = Sophmore in High school (tenth grade)
Year 12= Junior in High school (eleventh grade)
Year 13= Senior in High school

______= Freshman in College/ Uni
______= Sophmore in College/Uni
______= Junior in College/Uni
______= Senior in College/Uni

every year in highschool, students get state regents'. sadly students only need to pass only one to graduate. but at private schools its different
thats how it works in NY, other states its different
Right, thanks for that. So I'd be a Sophmore, I do my GCSE's this year then go to College for what would be your Junior and Senior years in High School. We also got to High School from your Sixth Grade to Sophmore year, our High School is basically just a smaller version of your one.
 

CP_Scouse

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Right, thanks for that. So I'd be a Sophmore, I do my GCSE's this year then go to College for what would be your Junior and Senior years in High School. We also got to High School from your Sixth Grade to Sophmore year, our High School is basically just a smaller version of your one.
in the u.k id be year 12. by then id be in college right?

also in the u.s year 12 and year 13 kids take the SAT to get into a prticular college or uni, which is hard af if one doesnt study
 

Falastur

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in the u.k id be year 12. by then id be in college right?

also in the u.s year 12 and year 13 kids take the SAT to get into a prticular college or uni, which is hard af if one doesnt study

Going to "College" as we call it is optional in the UK - you can go to a college, stay in school (where you basically do the same thing as you would in college, just...still in school, and with more-specialised teachers) or as of the last few years, you can go into an industrial apprenticeship. It used to be that you could leave school at the age of 16, but that was got rid of for the apprenticeship system, as mentioned.
 

CP_Scouse

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College is optional in the UK - you can go to a college, stay in school (where you basically do the same thing as you would in college, just...still in school, and with slightly less-specialised teachers) or as of the last few years, you can go into an industrial apprenticeship. It used to be that you could leave school at the age of 16, but that was got rid of for the apprenticeship system, as mentioned.
wouldnt the apprenticeship lead to less people with less degrees? in the u.s people need certain degress to do certain work. i know machinists need certain engineering degrees and certain machinist degrees to begin working (and being a machinist isnt hard either, all you do is press a button and pick up a hose). so in the u.k i dont need a degree to do hold a certain job?
 

Falastur

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wouldnt the apprenticeship lead to less people with less degrees? in the u.s people need certain degress to do certain work. i know machinists need certain engineering degrees and certain machinist degrees to begin working (and being a machinist isnt hard either, all you do is press a button and pick up a hose). so in the u.k i dont need a degree to do hold a certain job?

Degrees aren't as important in the UK - especially for blue-collar jobs, where degrees are viewed as far less important than practical experience. That said, there are still an awful lot of people who go to University - sufficiently many that more people (outside of the government) ask the question "are too many people going to Uni?" than "are too few?" There's a very real threat in some fields that the number of people going to Uni is diluting the importance of degrees, and five years after I graduated with a Mathematics degree I'm still finding that my friends are earning higher salaries than I am and I'm struggling to compete for jobs with those who didn't go to Uni and instead have four years more office experience than I do.

Besides, the apprenticeship system was not aimed at creating a rival to University - apprenticeships are much-more hands-on than theoretical, though there are some white-collar apprenticeships. The apprenticeship system was instead created to address the problem of high numbers of kids leaving school at the age of 16 with no qualifications (the types who basically sacked off their exams and got out as soon as they could) and were going out into the world just assuming that they could get a job "because my dad knows someone" only to find that when it fell through two years later they had nothing. There is a perceived belief that there is a growing demographic of qualification-less people in their twenties and thirties who are increasingly relying on the welfare system after they lose their jobs and then become dependent upon government handouts to the point that they stop looking for work. Whether you believe that is what is happening or not is largely politics.

Incidentally, this discussion is fun but it's pretty off-topic. If you want to keep discussing this stuff I'm going to split it off into another thread in the debate forum.
 
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CP_Scouse

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Degrees aren't as important in the UK - especially for blue-collar jobs, where degrees are viewed as far less important than practical experience. That said, there are still an awful lot of people who go to University - sufficiently many that more people (outside of the government) ask the question "are too many people going to Uni?" than "are too few?" There's a very real threat in some fields that the number of people going to Uni is diluting the importance of degrees, and five years after I graduated with a Mathematics degree I'm still finding that my friends are earning higher salaries than I am and I'm struggling to compete for jobs with those who didn't go to Uni and instead have four years more office experience than I do.

Besides, the apprenticeship system was not aimed at creating a rival to University - apprenticeships are much-more hands-on than theoretical, though there are some white-collar apprenticeships. The apprenticeship system was instead created to address the problem of high numbers of kids leaving school at the age of 16 with no qualifications (the types who basically sacked off their exams and got out as soon as they could) and were going out into the world just assuming that they could get a job "because my dad knows someone" only to find that when it fell through two years later they had nothing. There is a perceived belief that there is a growing demographic of qualification-less people in their twenties and thirties who are increasingly relying on the welfare system after they lose their jobs and then become dependent upon government handouts to the point that they stop looking for work. Whether you believe that is what is happening or not is largely politics.

Incidentally, this discussion is fun but it's pretty off-topic. If you want to keep discussing this stuff I'm going to split it off into another thread in the debate forum.
Yea to the debate forum. Tag EVERYONE involved in ur post
 

Across the Pond

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As Falustur says College is basically High School but more specialised. Like a mix of University and normal school. One of the main differences is that you only do 3-4 subjects, instead of around 8 I still do in High School (or secondary school). That's one of the main reasons I look forward to going to College as I can get rid of impractical subjects for me, such as Religion.
 

Across the Pond

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Ai, so jobs like plumbing and maintence would involve the apprentichship yea?
It's really up to the person, if they really wanted too they could go to Uni and then become a Plummer; I don't know purpose that would hold..

A good example is my mate. We did 3 exams early last year (English Literature, Religion and Core Science), I passed them all with A stars and A's. However, my mate failed them all, so D and below. He's didn't revise or really try in school and now he wants to do an apprenticeship. I think he and many do them, so they can just stop going to school.
 

CP_Scouse

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As Falustur says College is basically High School but more specialised. Like a mix of University and normal school. One of the main differences is that you only do 3-4 subjects, instead of around 8 I still do in High School (or secondary school). That's one of the main reasons I look forward to going to College as I can get rid of impractical subjects for me, such as Religion.
in the U.S, after senior year in highschool we need a Assosciates Degree (first 2 years of college) which is pretty much a harder level of highschool subjects
 

CP_Scouse

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It's really up to the person, if they really wanted too they could go to Uni and then become a Plummer; I don't know purpose that would hold..

A good example is my mate. We did 3 exams early last year (English Literature, Religion and Core Science), I passed them all with A stars and A's. However, my mate failed them all, so D and below. He's didn't revise or really try in school and now he wants to do an apprenticeship. I think he and many do them, so they can just stop going to school.
if i was him i would apprentice in security, they pay alot, i think